Gintong Kasaysayan, Gintong Pamana  (Filipino Americans: A Glorious History, A Golden Legacy) mural by artist Eliseo Silva is Los Angeles.

Gintong Kasaysayan, Gintong Pamana (Filipino Americans: A Glorious History, A Golden Legacy) mural by artist Eliseo Silva is Los Angeles.

 

Filipino American Political Participation

Filipinos were living in Louisiana as early as the 1750s and have been contributing members of American society ever since. They are also the third largest Asian group in the United States, with more than 3.4 million Filipinos belonging to communities nationwide. Despite this long history in the country and their considerable number, Filipino-Americans remain politically invisible, particularly at the federal level. 

The invisibility of Filipinos at the highest levels of U.S. government has serious implications for the Filipino-American community. The lack of elected officials at the federal level (and a vast majority of state governments) means that the community may not have advocates knowledgeable and passionate about issues unique to Filipinos who will push for statutes that address these concerns. Likewise, the lack of high-ranking Filipinos in federal and state agencies means that much needed resources may not get directed to the community. 

This research project, conducted in collaboration with Gem Daus of the University of Maryland, explores the factors that lead to the political invisibility of Filipinos in America and proposes ways for Filipinos to be more visible at all levels of elected office and government.  

 

Learning by Giving

Work in progress …